Top tips for setting a strong password

Top 5 tips for password setting

Earlier this year it was confirmed that the buying and selling giant eBay was the victim of a large scale criminal cyberattack. The database that was attacked included names, encrypted passwords, email addresses, physical addresses, phone numbers and dates of birth.

As a result eBay has urged all users to change their passwords to help ensure that their accounts can’t be compromised. If you’re an Ebay user then you might want to head over there and update your login details and when resetting your password(s), your aim should be to create the strongest password you can.

Setting a strong password that is both tough for hackers to crack and easy for you to remember sounds hard but with our top tips you could create a password such as Mph4c&ad which you’ll be able to remember every time!

Read on to find out how:

1) Use different passwords for different accounts

If you use the same password for every online account you use, then if one account was to be compromised, a hacker could potentially access every other account you own. It’s a good idea to try and use different passwords for every account, even if the difference is only small (though we don’t mean just adding a 1 or a 2 on to the end).

If you do want to use the same password for most accounts then be sure you always use a separate and completely different password for your work account, bank accounts, credit report and your personal email.

2) Tighten your email

Even if you use different passwords for every account you operate online, as mentioned above, you need to ensure that the password to your personal email account is as strong as you can make it.

If a hacker can gain access to your emails then this puts them in strong position to access every other account as most password reset options on other sites will almost always come in to your personal email.

3) Mobile security?

Most of us with smartphones tend to always leave them logged in to our email inboxes and social media pages. It’s easy and convenient for us but that means it’s easy and convenient for fraudsters too if they’re to somehow get access to your phone.

So for this reason it’s important to always add an extra layer of protection to your phone with a PIN code to unlock it.

4) MAke ThEm StronG

Remembering a complicated password doesn’t have to be difficult and there are several good ways to create a memorable password that’s tough to crack.

– Use a memorable phrase

Hackers are smart and often use programs that quickly test millions of password combinations a second based upon the words and numbers that we’re most likely to use. For this reason, complex passwords that are filled with capital letters, numbers and special characters in seemingly bizarre arrangements are the toughest to crack.

These types of passwords can seem hard to remember but by using a simple and memorable phrase you can do it easily.

For example, if you take the sentence ‘My parents have four cats and a dog
It could become ‘My parents have 4 cats & a dog’.

With just that simple phrase you’ve suddenly got a strong password of ‘Mph4c&ad

– Use the full passphrase?

Another option is to use the entire sentence ‘‘Myparentshavefourcatsandadog” as although it uses standard words, its length makes it tough to crack but many password options have a character cut off. In that case try picking each alternate word, E.g. ‘Myhavecatsa’.

Callcredit security suggest that you never use passwords of 7 characters or less, or use ones made of one or two common words, even if letters are substituted for numbers (such as L33dsUtd).

5) Mix and Match

You might have created a strong password using a phrase you can easily remember but how can you adapt that to each account you use? No matter how strong it is, if you use it for every account then you’re back to square one if someone does manage to hack it. Callcredit recommend using a memorable prefix from each website you use your password for and adding it on.

If you use your password from above “Mph4c&ad” you could try adding the last two letters of each site to the start of the password. For example:

For FacebookokMph4c&ad
For TwittererMph4c&ad
For AmazononMph4c&ad

Is there a chance your details could have been hacked already? If so, what can you do about it?

You can sign up to Noddle Identity Protection which was designed specifically to help you keep track of your most sensitive data online. For more information, click here.

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